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Diet Talk from the Doc

 
by Dr.Diet, Diet.com's Medical Director

 
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Listing calories per portion on the front of food packages was the preferred method of communicating nutritional information to consumers, according to a new research study conducted by the European Food Information Council.

Consumers want energy-based food labeling, says EUFIC
To read the full article, click here:
https://foodnavigator.com/news/printNewsBis.asp?id=70457

Dr. Diet weighs in:

I included this European study in my blog because I thought it brought up some interesting ideas regarding food labeling.

Our food labels have been criticized for quite a while because it’s not always clear what the calories are for the portion that you eat.

For example, if you buy a package of chips that says 170 calories, you may think that’s all you’re eating - unless you happen to notice that the bag of chips really contains 2 ½ servings. So, if you eat the whole bag, then you’re really eating 170 times 2.5 or 425 calories. Do you typically carry a calculator with you when you shop?

Apparently, consumers from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, also would like clearer nutrition information on their labels.

Another scenario discussed in this article is imagine if after doing your shopping, your calorie count appeared on your receipt. Since calories purchased in a grocery store don’t always equal calories eaten, this concept may apply better to restaurant receipts where you really could get a tally of what you ordered - and ate.




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