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Shrink Yourself blogger Dr. Roger Gould is one of the world’s leading authorities on emotional eating. He has helped thousands reclaim their power over food by conquering emotional eating, the number one cause of weight gain. Dr. Gould’s approach has been the subject of seven scientific studies.

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Shrink Yourself
by Dr. Roger Gould, Emotional eating expert

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Coming on the heels of Valentine’s Day you might be riding high or disappointed. Relationships and the expectations that they bring can leave us feeling empty or full.

Humans turn to food to fill them up when they’re empty. This happens when they’re biologically hungry but it also happens when they’re emotionally hungry. One area where many people fall short in their level of satisfaction is in their romantic lives.

Read below to determine if your relationship issues could be affecting your weight.

1. They don't provide sweetness, so you look for it somewhere else.

Not to be so literal about things but human beings crave sweetness in life. When asking for affection, lovers say to each other, “give me some sugar.” In a recent study, rats preferred sugar to cocaine. The sweetness that you long for is love, tenderness, sex and affection. Oftentimes, when partners fall short of providing those things, people look to sweets instead. If you’re missing the “sugar” in your relationship that could be causing some of your weight gain.

2. There's something you want to say but you stuff it in with food.

Expressing how you feel in a way that is effective is challenging even for the most mature and evolved person. Many people keep their feelings bottled up. People have even said that they “shove food in to keep angry words from coming out.” If you’re afraid to express yourself you could be keeping your unspoken words down with food.


3. You eat to keep them ...    Continue

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@ 9:00pm ET on February 22, 2009 This is sooo true!!! I fall in to more than one of these, unfortunately. Look forward to next weeks blog!
@ 9:48am ET on February 23, 2009 Ditto the previous comment. My husband gains a little weight, but not in relation to how much he eats.

My father was one who ate tons of 'bad' food: real cream in his coffee, ice cream every day, peanut butter by the spoonful, fried fatback, fried chicken, fried pork chops, 'real' butter ... And he ate about every two hours all day every day. Never gained an ounce. My mother and I could drink nothing but water, diet sodas, and eat salads with diet dressing and nothing else for a month and we'd gain weight.

I remember once, my mother was in the living room with Daddy and me and she told me, "Just look at your daddy over there, drinking milkshakes and eating cake. I just want to slap him."
@ 2:47pm ET on February 24, 2009 yes its true what im lacking emotionally im making it with food.oh boy!!!!!!!!
@ 3:48am ET on April 7, 2009 My new hubby is wonderful, warm, caring, considerate, loving, but at the moment I having bad issues with ex-hubby which is affecting my 8 year old daughter, and my new hubby not understand why I so stressed and eating wrong things all the time, and no good things most of the time, so I guess I taking the support and comfort from the chocolate as hubby not giving it to me, I never thought of it like that, but its true.
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