Carbohydrates and Cholesterol     New User?   Already a member?  Log in!
 

Post new topic   Reply to topic    View all forums -> Rate My Plate
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
DietitianConsult
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Total Posts: 1989

PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 7:36 pm    Post subject: Carbohydrates and Cholesterol Reply with quote

A diet.com member recently asked....

Good evening,

I received doctors orders to:

Cut back on carbohydrates due to elevated Cholesterol

I get hypoglycemia (but not diabetic) if I don't eat frequently so it has been quite a challenge to loose weight.

So, what is a good level of carb/sugar intake per day? I need to lose weight but don't want to cut carbs compleltely out because doing that is also very unhealthy.

Thanks!

Meghan McCarron,MS,RD,LDN
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DietitianConsult
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Total Posts: 1989

PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi!

I'm glad you recognize that cutting all carbs out of your diet is not a healthy way to lose weight! And your doctor is right about needing to moderate carbohydrate intake. When you consume more carbohydrate than your body needs, it gets stored as fat (triglycerides), which leads to weight gain and high cholesterol. The trick is to choose complex carbohydrates most of the time that will not only prevent hypoglycemia, but will also aid in lowering your cholesterol.

Complex carbohydrates are high in fiber, and it's recommended you consume ~25 grams of fiber a day for heart health (I would increase fiber intake slowly to avoid stomach discomfort). Good sources of complex carbs include fruits, vegetables, beans/legumes and whole grain breads, cereals and pastas/rice. Good sources of fiber usually contain at least 4 grams of fiber per serving.

For you, based on your age, height and weight for weight loss you need to consume ~1400 calories and 165 grams of carbohydrate a day (47% of calories).

Try to get at least 3-5 cups of fruits and vegetables daily and make at least half of your grains whole grains. For management of the hypoglycemia, make sure you are consuming at 3 meals a day, and at least 2 snacks a day. Be sure to incorporate fiber and protein-rich foods into most meals and snacks to prevent drops in your blood sugar.

I hope this helps! If you have any other questions at all, don't hesitate to ask and I'll be sure to get back to you as quick as possible!

Meghan

Meghan McCarron,MS,RD,LDN
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DietitianConsult
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Total Posts: 1989

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Diet.com member replied....

Thanks for getting back to me!

When I saw my PCP, I received no guidance whatsoever on HOW to reduce my carb intake in a healthy way. Luckily I have learned about ketosis/ketoacidosis/glucose metabolism already so I know to stay away from the Low Carb Diets. Now I just need to research complex carb foods.

By the way, when I am at the supermarket, the food labels only indicate Carbohydrates in general and not Complex Carb counts. What is a good rule of thumb when looking at nutrition content in foods? Meaning, for every 10 grams of carbohydrates listed, how many grams of fiber should be present to keep blood sugar stable?


Last edited by DietitianConsult on Thu May 06, 2010 12:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DietitianConsult
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Total Posts: 1989

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fortunately, complex carbs are easier to understand than ketosis, etc:D. When you are looking at food labels, there are two places you can look to find good info: 1. the Dietary Fiber and 2. the ingredient list.

For breads and cereals, you want to look for 100% whole wheat in the name(they will have whole wheat (not enriched) as the first ingredient). Other words to look for are rye, oats or bran in the first few ingredients on the list. Other sources of whole grain include barley, brown rice, wild rice, quinoa, oats, and buckwheat.

By incorporating fruits and vegetables (raw or cooked), beans (any kind) and nuts/seeds/flax to your daily intake you will easily be consuming enough fiber to help with cholesterol and stabilize blood sugar.

When reading food labels, you want to look at "Dietary Fiber" under Total Carbohydrates. As a general rule of thumb, very good sources of fiber will contain at least 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving. I would use this as a guide instead of looking at total carbohydrates.

As you increase your fiber intake, do it slowly and make sure you drink plenty of fluids (avoiding high sugar drinks of course ). For females, 25 grams of fiber per day is the recommendation, but increasing fiber can be tough on the GI tract, so monitor how you feel, keep yourself hydrated and add slowly and you should be meeting that goal in no time!

Great questions, keep them coming!

Meghan McCarron,MS,RD,LDN
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    View all forums -> Rate My Plate Page 1 of 1


Not a member yet?    Already a member?




  SEARCH:   Web diet.com
Powered By: