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bajacalla



Joined: 11 Apr 2009
Total Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 6:31 pm    Post subject: fat Reply with quote

no, not me. : ) fat in my diet.

is there a way to calculate how much fat I should maximally be ingesting daily/weekly/per meal?

I've heard it's a function of percentage of total daily optimal calories, but my trainer isn't sure, and thinks it may be an actual number, based on my age/weight regardless of maximum calories.

can you clarify this for us?

Man does not live by bread alone... brownies are where it's at.
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DietitianConsult
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Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Total Posts: 1989

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good question about fats! A good rule of thumb is to keep fat intake between 20-35% of your daily calories. Lets say you strive for 25% and you’re on a 1600 calorie/day diet. That means 400 calories/day should come from fat, max. There are 9 calories in a gram of fat, so 400 / 9 = 44g fat per day. But don’t stop there! The healthy hint is that the majority of your fat intake should be from unsaturated fats (to include polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats). These are healthy fats that we should be eating more of. Foods that have these HEALTHY fats are things like fish (salmon, sardines, mackerel), walnuts, almonds, flax seed/flax oil, olive oil. These fats are good for our hearts and keep us satisfied – its important to include them in the daily diet.

Your saturated fat intake (that’s the unhealthy fat) should be no more than 7% of your calories, so on a 1600 calorie/day diet, that is no more than 12g of saturated fat per day, or even lower if you can! Saturated fat is found mainly in animal products – so dairy (unless its fat free), meat, cheese, eggs, chicken, etc. It is in a lot of baked goods and junk foods like chips. Try to eat lean cuts of meat, non-fat dairy, and reduce your red meat intake to no more than one serving per week for the best health benefits.

Then there is trans fat. You want to keep that to ZERO! It is unhealthy and harmful to our bodies. It can be found in some baked goods and processed foods. Look on the nutrition label or for the words “partially hydrogenated oil” in an ingredient list.

Everyone’s fat intake is going to be different and it is not based on your age/weight but rather your calorie and energy needs.

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any questions.
Dietitian Janel

Meghan McCarron,MS,RD,LDN
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bajacalla



Joined: 11 Apr 2009
Total Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 6:44 pm    Post subject: thank you! Reply with quote

that does clear it up considerably!

now, if I only had a program where I could plug in what I eat and have it calculate all those figures for me: calories, calories from fat, totals and types of fat, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, etc., instead of figuring it out all on my own.

I'm beginning to think I should have majored in math! ; )

Man does not live by bread alone... brownies are where it's at.
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DietitianConsult
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Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Total Posts: 1989

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might find some success with a variety of online programs where you can enter your daily diet intake, and it will tell you your percentage of fat, fiber, carbs, protein, saturated fat, nutrients etc. for the day. I like programs like thedailyplate.com or sparkpeople.com for this. Mypyramid.gov is another great program that even gives you smiley faces or frown faces based on whether or not you met specific nutrient needs each day!
For a simpler rule of thumb that doesn't require mathmatical calculations: stick with low fat foods and when you do consume fat, eat those heart healthy fats. Have each of your meals and sancks balanced with healthy carbs (like whole wheat toast, brown rice or whole wheat crackers) and a good source of protein, such as peanut butter, low fat yogurt, or hummus.
Hope this helps!
Dietitian Janel

Meghan McCarron,MS,RD,LDN
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