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Jakeness



Joined: 23 Jan 2008
Total Posts: 3

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:24 am    Post subject: Healthy eating habits for muscles Reply with quote

I've been working out for a while now and I am satisfied with the results, but I would like to start a more healthy diet to give me more energy and help my muscles grow.

Any suggestions?
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mackadoodle



Joined: 03 May 2005
Total Posts: 1342

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 2:51 am    Post subject: Re: Healthy eating habits for muscles Reply with quote

Jakeness wrote:
I've been working out for a while now and I am satisfied with the results, but I would like to start a more healthy diet to give me more energy and help my muscles grow.

Any suggestions?

Its pretty difficult for anyone to give you specific suggestions without knowing anything about YOUR current specifics. And of course, there is more than one approach to successful gain. But here are a few of the general basic principles:

In order for muscles to grow, they need to worked (and rested) properly AND fed well.

You need the right balance of carbs/proteins/fats.

Timing plays a role too. Pre-workout meals and post-workout meals are usually different from the rest of the daily meals.

Daily needs can vary too. Caloric and/or macro-nutrient requirements are usually different on heavy training days than on light training days.

Overall, calories need to be at a surplus... or at least alternate cycles of surplus and maintenance. You need enough calories for muscle-growth/weight-gain. You CAN'T gain a notable amount of muscle without gaining weight. However, you want to gain SLOWLY, in order to ensure maximum muscle-gain and minimal accompanying fat-gain. Muscle gain takes time & patience. Just how many calories you need depends on your current weight and a few other variables.

Also, your needs change & evolve as you progress.

What is your current diet like?

What is your current workout plan like? And what exactly are the results, you mentioned, that you're happy with? At any rate, its great that you're happy with them!
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Jakeness



Joined: 23 Jan 2008
Total Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply Smile

Well, I never exercise when I know I'm tired and my muscle never hurt so they're rested well.

I usually work out daily after I eat dinner and finish most of my homework, which is usually around 7-8 PM, on schooldays. I usually don't eat anything after that. On weekends I'll do it a few hours after waking up. I always do the same routine.

I'd be okay if I weigh a little more than I should as long as it's from muscle and some fat and not just a whole lot of fat.

My current diet... it's not that bad but it's no where near good. I've been able to gain a little control over myself when I walk into the kitchen and see some cookies or cake. Sometimes walk away, feeling good about myself that I did one little thing healthier. But other times I give in to the sugary goodness Neutral and I usually give in.

My current work out is a lot better than when I started, which is just over a month ago. I look much better than when I started; my abs and arms are more defined. I run about 2.5 miles on a cycle also. But I still don't feel as good as I should knowing I still eat the same as before I started exercising, which isn't very healthy.
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mackadoodle



Joined: 03 May 2005
Total Posts: 1342

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jakeness wrote:
Thanks for the reply Smile

Well, I never exercise when I know I'm tired and my muscle never hurt so they're rested well.

You're welcome. Well, sometimes we need to workout even when we are tired. Its usually best... when when we have specific goals... to have a clear-cut planned routine, designed to get us there... rather than randomly exercising when we feel up to it. Not to say, you won't need an UNplanned rest day sometimes. You will. We do need to listen to our bodies. (And we need to make sure we aren't over-training or under-eating... this will help prevent fatigue.)

But by "rested properly" I meant PLANNED, DESIGNATED rests.
EXAMPLE: If I do lots of heavy leg-work today (squats, deadlifts, step-ups, presses, etc...) then I should definitely NOT do it again tomorrow. It wouldn't make much sense for me to have 2 heavy leg days planned in a row. My legs need to rest/recover. In fact, often its even good to take a day off from cardio too, following a heavy leg day, and just do upper-body work.
ANOTHER EXAMPLE: When a person has been training VERY hard for several weeks/months... it can be wearing/draining. Sometimes its good to plan a full week or two off from training... with maybe just some lighter activity like shooting a few hoops with friends, or whatever. Then when he returns to heavy training... he'll be all rested, ready to go, and sometimes even a bit stronger.

Those are just examples. It should all be in specific, well-designed plan... a plan that takes these, and many other variables, into consideration.

Jakeness wrote:
I usually work out daily after I eat dinner and finish most of my homework, which is usually around 7-8 PM, on schooldays. I usually don't eat anything after that. On weekends I'll do it a few hours after waking up.

You don't need to workout 7 days per week. You need "off" days. Or if you prefer to work out every day, some of your workouts should be lighter... and you should definitely be letting at least part of your body recover.

Why don't you eat after your workouts? If you want your muscles to grow, your diet is every bit as important as your workouts. You shouldn't be skipping your post-workout meal.

Jakeness wrote:
I always do the same routine.

Every day? Why do you always do the same routine? And what exactly is your workout routine?
Exactly which exercises?
How many sets/reps of each? How much weight?
Do you set weight increase goals or do you always use the same amount of weight?

Would you mind giving me an example of your exact routine?

Jakeness wrote:
I'd be okay if I weigh a little more than I should as long as it's from muscle and some fat and not just a whole lot of fat.

First of all, who's to say how much you "should" weigh? If you're going by the BMI, or some other random chart, fergiddabout it. Nobody can say how much you "should" weigh but you.

Generally, when it comes to muscle-building or physique-transformations.. people are going for a certain look, not weight. The right weight for you will be whatever you happen to weigh when you've reached the desired levels of muscle-size and/or leanness. That's why pictures every couple weeks.. or once a month.. make a better montitor than the scale. So you can actually see the changes in your physique. The scale is an important monitor too... because you don't want to gain too quickly (or too much of it will be fat)... and you don't want to lose too quickly (to ensure that you're keeping your muscle). So yes, you do need a scale for monitoring your rate of gains or losses.

That being said, you should probably decide if this is something you really want or not. If you really really want bigger muscles (I'm not talking about hugantic, freakish muscles) but if you want to add any noticable size at all, you will have to gain weight. And yes, some of it WILL be fat. HOWEVER, it doesn't have to be a crazy amount of fat. With a well designed plan, there are ways to maximize muscle-gain, while keeping the inevitible accompanying fat-gain to a minimum.

On the flip side, when you're ready, with a well-designed plan, you can also trim off that fat, without losing too much of your newly gained muscle. Its generally a cyclicle thing... bulk (add muscle size) for a while... followed by cutting (remove fat to see muscle-definition).

EITHER WAY PLANNING IS KEY! You need a VERY good, well designed plan. I can't stress that enough. If you have physique goals, you NEED a plan to get there.

(I can suggest some good books on muscle building if you like. There are thousands of them out there, but only a handful of good ones.)

Jakeness wrote:
My current diet... it's not that bad but it's no where near good. I've been able to gain a little control over myself when I walk into the kitchen and see some cookies or cake. Sometimes walk away, feeling good about myself that I did one little thing healthier. But other times I give in to the sugary goodness Neutral and I usually give in.

What do you mean your diet is "nowhere near good"? I still have no idea what your diet is like except that you feel you eat too much sugar... and that you neglect to feed yourself post-workout.

Average calories per day?
Balance of macros? (fats/proteins/carbs)
How many meals per day?
How many hours in between meals?
Do you plan your meals or do you just eat randomly?

And yep, when you're young and in school, and still living at home, there is often too much "sugary goodness" in the kitchen tempting you. The good news is you don't need to give these things up altogether. Most good diet plans (whether for gaining or losing) will incorporate 'treats' somewhere.

Jakeness wrote:
My current work out is a lot better than when I started, which is just over a month ago. I look much better than when I started; my abs and arms are more defined. I run about 2.5 miles on a cycle also. But I still don't feel as good as I should knowing I still eat the same as before I started exercising, which isn't very healthy.

What do you mean by saying that your current workout is "better" than it was? Do you mean you're getting stronger? Lifting heavier? More organized? More diversified?

BUT HEY! YAY FOR DEFINITION in your abs and arms!!! That would be a result of your diet mostly. I'm guessing that you've lost a little weight? Your weight-training will shape & strengthen the muscles... but its fat-loss that makes them visible. The more definition you have (without flexing) the leaner (low bodyfat) you are. NICE WORK!!!

Unfortunately, as I'd mentioned... you can't cut and build at the same time. If you're serious about muscle-growth... then you have to accept there will also be a little fat-gain. Not to say you need to get all roly-poly (if that happens then something is wrong with your plan). But you will lose some definition while bulking. And you won't get it back until you go into a cutting/leaning (fat-reduction) phase.

Each phase... bulking(muscle-growth) or cutting(fat-loss)... is time consuming. It takes a while to see the results from either. And you CAN'T do both at the same time. (well, there are exceptions but that's another whole book Laughing)
Exclamation MUSCLE GROWTH requires a calorie SURPLUS.
Exclamation FAT-LOSS requires a calorie DEFICIT.
(That's why it baffles me that so many women are afraid that weight-training will give them big, bulky muscles... even though they're dieting at a deficit. It just ain't gonna happen without a calorie surplus and a weight-gain.)

So you just need to decide which is more important to you right now. Adding muscle-size or seeing definition.

Hope this helps. Dang! I should just recommend some books instead of writing one. Laughing


Last edited by mackadoodle on Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:59 pm; edited 17 times in total
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mackadoodle



Joined: 03 May 2005
Total Posts: 1342

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also want to add that this site ISN'T geared toward muscle building. It is a site that focuses on healthy diets for healthy fat-loss.

Interestingly enough though... many of the basic principles, of a healthy diet, for building are the same as for losing. There are some differences... including, of course, the obvious caloric needs difference.
Also - whether dieting to GAIN or dieting to LOSE, we need to do a little tweaking (periodic adjustments) as we progress.

Your post caught my eye when you mentioned that you would like your muscles to "grow". I'm NO expert, by any means, but I do happen to know a little bit about it.

I can't give you an exact, specific plan. But I can definitely give you some very good, basic guidelines... and answer some of your questions... and tell you where you can find more good info on "building"... so that you can design a good plan for yourself.

Unfortunately, there's just as much hogwash, floating around out there, about building as there is about losing (books, magazine articles & ads, tv ads, etc... even in gyms). I've been sifting through the rubble for years to get to the goods... and I'll be happy to direct you straight to the goods, so that you don't have to do the same.
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Jakeness



Joined: 23 Jan 2008
Total Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mackadoodle wrote:
But by "rested properly" I meant PLANNED, DESIGNATED rests.
EXAMPLE: If I do lots of heavy leg-work today (squats, deadlifts, step-ups, presses, etc...) then I should definitely NOT do it again tomorrow. It wouldn't make much sense for me to have 2 heavy leg days planned in a row. My legs need to rest/recover. In fact, often its even good to take a day off from cardio too, following a heavy leg day, and just do upper-body work.
ANOTHER EXAMPLE: When a person has been training VERY hard for several weeks/months... it can be wearing/draining. Sometimes its good to plan a full week or two off from training... with maybe just some lighter activity like shooting a few hoops with friends, or whatever. Then when he returns to heavy training... he'll be all rested, ready to go, and sometimes even a bit stronger.
Those are just examples. It should all be in specific, well-designed plan... a plan that takes these, and many other variables, into consideration.

Ah, I don't exactly "plan" rests, but since I've started exercising I sleep an hour or two earlier than I used to.
mackadoodle wrote:
You don't need to workout 7 days per week. You need "off" days. Or if you prefer to work out every day, some of your workouts should be lighter... and you should definitely be letting at least part of your body recover.

I've heard that soooo many times before but I keep ignoring that advice even though I'm pretty sure it's correct. The reason I haven't skipped any days or lightened anything is because (so far, at least) I've been doing good with the everyday. I have to willpower enough to put time aside to do it and I'm not feeling overworked.
mackadoodle wrote:
Why don't you eat after your workouts? If you want your muscles to grow, your diet is every bit as important as your workouts. You shouldn't be skipping your post-workout meal.

Okay. I'll try to eat a (hopefully healthy) meal sometime after I finish.
mackadoodle wrote:
Every day? Why do you always do the same routine? And what exactly is your workout routine?
Exactly which exercises?
How many sets/reps of each? How much weight?
Do you set weight increase goals or do you always use the same amount of weight?

Would you mind giving me an example of your exact routine?

Sorry for the "slang" in the following but I'll do my best to describe it.
This is how I stated out on December 22nd, 2007:
-8 minute abs
-30 chest pushups
-20 triangle pushups
-30 curls with a 4.5 kilogram
-30 "pullups" with a 4.5 kilogram (I put my arm off to the side and lift the weight as if I were doing pullups)
-100 "benches" with a 4.5 kilogram (I practically "bench" the weight but since it's lighter than the giant weights that you usally bench with I just bench it more.)

This is what I do now:
-8 minute abs
-40 chest pushups
-20 triangle pushups
-50 curls with a 7.2 kilogram
-50 "pullups" with a 7.2 kilogram
-30 "overheads" with a 7.2 kilogram (I put the weight behind my head and slowly lift it above my head and then slowly back down)
-150 benches with a 7.2 kilogram
-30 shrugs with dual 7.2 kilograms
-10 minutes of rowing (It's like rowing a boat but there's a machine for it)
-2.5 miles of running in about 9 minutes on an elliptical

I don't set any goals to increase the amount of weight I life or how long I row or or fast I run, I just increase it as I feel fit. If the weight feels much lighter than it used to, I either increase the weight or do it more. Same basis for how far/fast I run.
mackadoodle wrote:
First of all, who's to say how much you "should" weigh? Nobody can say how much you "should" weigh but you.

I have to say that's one of my favorite things anyone has ever said. Very Happy
mackadoodle wrote:
Generally, when it comes to muscle-building or physique-transformations.. people are going for a certain look, not weight. The right weight for you will be whatever you happen to weigh when you've reached the desired levels of muscle-size and/or leanness. That's why pictures every couple weeks.. or once a month.. make a better montitor than the scale. So you can actually see the changes in your physique. The scale is an important monitor too... because you don't want to gain too quickly (or too much of it will be fat)... and you don't want to lose too quickly (to ensure that you're keeping your muscle). So yes, you do need a scale for monitoring your rate of gains or losses.

I haven't really been monitoring how I look or how much I weigh. The only way of "monitoring" my progress is a... Microsoft Word document that I write my changing exercise routines in. I'll be sure to take some pictures and check the scale from now on.
mackadoodle wrote:
That being said, you should probably decide if this is something you really want or not. If you really really want bigger muscles (I'm not talking about hugantic, freakish muscles) but if you want to add any noticable size at all, you will have to gain weight. And yes, some of it WILL be fat. HOWEVER, it doesn't have to be a crazy amount of fat. With a well designed plan, there are ways to maximize muscle-gain, while keeping the inevitible accompanying fat-gain to a minimum.

On the flip side, when you're ready, with a well-designed plan, you can also trim off that fat, without losing too much of your newly gained muscle. Its generally a cyclicle thing... bulk (add muscle size) for a while... followed by cutting (remove fat to see muscle-definition).

EITHER WAY PLANNING IS KEY! You need a VERY good, well designed plan. I can't stress that enough. If you have physique goals, you NEED a plan to get there.

I'm sure I want to do this. But you've taught me that I have to focus harder on my planning. I should set some goals, make sure I don't eat too much or too little, etc.
mackadoodle wrote:
(I can suggest some good books on muscle building if you like. There are thousands of them out there, but only a handful of good ones.)

That'd be wonderful. Smile
mackadoodle wrote:
What do you mean your diet is "nowhere near good"? I still have no idea what your diet is like except that you feel you eat too much sugar... and that you neglect to feed yourself post-workout.

Average calories per day?
Balance of macros? (fats/proteins/carbs)
How many meals per day?
How many hours in between meals?
Do you plan your meals or do you just eat randomly?

And yep, when you're young and in school, and still living at home, there is often too much "sugary goodness" in the kitchen tempting you. The good news is you don't need to give these things up altogether. Most good diet plans (whether for gaining or losing) will incorporate 'treats' somewhere.

I didn't/don't count my calories or plan my meals. I eat randomly. I eat lunch seven hours after my breakfast... I wouldn't normally wait that long but at school my lunch is also my second-to-last class.
Something I just started doing a few days ago is eating when I feel bad. I think I'm coming close to losing one of my closest friends I've known for four years and also happens to be my girlfriend. So, when I feel bad about that situation I eat some salt & vinegar potatoe chips because they have a very strong, distinct taste and it helps clear my mind.
mackadoodle wrote:
BUT HEY! YAY FOR DEFINITION in your abs and arms!!! That would be a result of your diet mostly. I'm guessing that you've lost a little weight? Your weight-training will shape & strengthen the muscles... but its fat-loss that makes them visible. The more definition you have (without flexing) the leaner (low bodyfat) you are. NICE WORK!!!

Haha, thanks.
I might have lost 5 pounds, because I now weigh about 105 pounds, but the last time I checked before I started exercising was long before that and it was 110. There's a chance I could've lost, gained, or stayed the same weight.
mackadoodle wrote:
Unfortunately, as I'd mentioned... you can't cut and build at the same time. If you're serious about muscle-growth... then you have to accept there will also be a little fat-gain. Not to say you need to get all roly-poly (if that happens then something is wrong with your plan). But you will lose some definition while bulking. And you won't get it back until you go into a cutting/leaning (fat-reduction) phase.

Each phase... bulking(muscle-growth) or cutting(fat-loss)... is time consuming. It takes a while to see the results from either. And you CAN'T do both at the same time. (well, there are exceptions but that's another whole book Laughing)
Exclamation MUSCLE GROWTH requires a calorie SURPLUS.
Exclamation FAT-LOSS requires a calorie DEFICIT.
(That's why it baffles me that so many women are afraid that weight-training will give them big, bulky muscles... even though they're dieting at a deficit. It just ain't gonna happen without a calorie surplus and a weight-gain.)

So you just need to decide which is more important to you right now. Adding muscle-size or seeing definition.

I didn't know that I needed a surplus of calories. I'll make sure to get some more. Actually, I didn't really know anything that you wrote about in that section.
mackadoodle wrote:
Hope this helps. Dang! I should just recommend some books instead of writing one. Laughing

Oh yeah, you've been very helpful. Very Happy Thanks a bunch! And that made me laugh, you do write a lot.
mackadoodle wrote:
I also want to add that this site ISN'T geared toward muscle building. It is a site that focuses on healthy diets for healthy fat-loss.

Oooooooo sorry. I knew it wasn't geared towards muscle building but I thought it was geared towards any type of diet whatsoever. Whether it be weight loss, weight gain, muscle growth, overall healthy lifestyles, or any type of diet that someone might need.
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mackadoodle



Joined: 03 May 2005
Total Posts: 1342

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jakeness wrote:
Oooooooo sorry. I knew it wasn't geared towards muscle building but I thought it was geared towards any type of diet whatsoever. Whether it be weight loss, weight gain, muscle growth, overall healthy lifestyles, or any type of diet that someone might need.

No need to apologize. You have as much right to be here as anybody. I was just letting you know... since muscle-growth seems to be important to you... that you won't find much information about it here.

At this point, from what what I can see, neither your diet nor your workouts are conducive to building muscle. Please don't take that the wrong way... that's not a slam on you at all. You're young & fairly new to this whole muscle-building thing... and its only natural that you would have a lot to learn. Gaining muscle is quite an involved process and there IS a lot to learn... for anybody.

When I said nobody can tell you what you should weigh... I just meant that when it comes to muscle-growth you'll weigh what you weigh when you get there. There is a such thing as an unhealthy weight too. Have people (your family/parents/friends) been expressing concerns over your weight? Do they think you're getting too skinny? Or do they think you aren't eating enough? If so, do you think their concerns are valid?

Honestly, your reluctance to give your body a break from training... your concerns about weighing more than you "should"... and feeling guilty or "bad" about what you've had to eat... kinda concern me too. There's a HUGE difference between being focused & disciplined on a fitness plan... and taking an unhealthy, obsessive approach. The latter can actually have the opposite results... and ultimately lead to muscle-deterioration in the long-run, instead of growth. Is there a Physical Education teacher, or a fitness/athletic coach, at your school, you can talk to?

And sorry about your girlfriend. That's never an easy thing. Heartache sucks, for sure.
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Venissa Park



Joined: 19 Oct 2014
Total Posts: 15

PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2014 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For optimal muscle health, the protein-rich foods you eat must contain essential amino acids, the building blocks of protein your body canít synthesize.Milk protein is particularly good for healthy muscles
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