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Debunking The 10 Most-Common Cellulite Myths
by LionelBissoon

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by Lionel Bissoon

Although about 90% of American women suffer from some degree of cellulite, it’s not uncommon for many to think that, somehow, the condition is their own fault –- that they must have brought it on themselves. Unfortunately, many boyfriends, husbands and significant others fuel this unwarranted guilt complex by suggesting that...

"You haven’t stayed in shape by exercising enough."

"You’ve gotten fat, which is (obviously) the cause of cellulite. Cellulite is something overweight women get, right?"

"There’s nothing you can do about it. Your mother and grandmother had cellulite, so you’re doomed to live with it... DOOMED! How’s your sister doing?"


Regardless of what you’ve heard "through the grapevine," it’s VERY difficult for women living in highly industrialized Western societies to avoid developing cellulite if they’re genetically predisposed to it AND the right conditions exist to help it surface.

Here are 10 common myths and facts about cellulite and its treatments. Stop me if you’ve heard some (or all) of them.

1. Men don’t get cellulite. Believe it or not, 10% of men suffer from cellulite.

2. You must be overweight to have cellulite. In fact, thin women often display the worst cellulite.

3. Exercise eliminates cellulite. This is absolutely untrue. Cellulite consists of little pockets of herniated fat. When you exercise, it is tough to localize the exercise so that it burns off only the fat pockets contained in the affected areas. Building smooth muscle beneath the skin can help smooth out the surface.

4. Liposuction is an effective treatment. Liposuction is not a proven cellulite treatment. Yet plastic surgeons and dermatologists continue to recommend this invasive surgery. It’s a pity they don’t read their own literature, since it reveals that liposuction has actually been shown to make cellulite worse.

5. Creams can effectively treat cellulite. There are several reasons why most creams cannot treat cellulite. Most creams can only treat one component of cellulite –- usually the fat component. Very few are designed to affect the circulation and connective tissues that contribute to cellulite development. To the best of my knowledge, only one cream treats all three aspects of cellulite. And NO cream can treat dimples.

6. Diet will cure cellulite. Diets will not cure cellulite. I’ve seen women lose weight and gain cellulite. That said, a diet rich in organic foods can prevent cellulite from occurring. And once cellulite has appeared, a diet rich in organic foods can retard the condition. However, diet won’t completely reverse cellulite.

7. Tanning will camouflage cellulite. Tanning will make light skin darker, but the cellulite will still be visible. Women of Mediterranean descent tend to have darker complexions, but their cellulite still remains visible. The same holds true of black women with cellulite. In short, this is an absurd myth.

8. Saddle bags are a sign of cellulite. Saddlebags do NOT indicate the presence of cellulite. By definition, cellulite refers to lumpy, bumpy skin with dimpling. Many women have saddlebags but display zero signs of cellulite. (BTW: Western culture considers saddlebags unattractive, but some other cultures consider them sexy.)

9. Cellulite is hereditary. A woman’s body is designed to develop cellulite under certain conditions. If these conditions are not met, however, no cellulite will occur. In other words, having a genetic predisposition to cellulite doesn’t mean you are destined to have it. In one case, I met with twins where one sister displayed little to no cellulite, but the other had prominent cellulite. I’ve also worked on cases where mothers have no cellulite, but the daughters do.

10. There is no cure for cellulite. Despite the nay-saying of plastic surgeons, dermatologists and other self-professed experts who state, “Just live with it,” “Nothing can be done,” and (worst of all) “it’s in your mind,” there is a cure for cellulite and the associated dimples!

Mesotherapy can eliminate cellulite in about 10-15 sessions when performed by a physician skilled in this medical specialty. Dimples can be easily repaired by a simple in-office procedure called Subcision and/or Stringcision. Mesotherapy and Subcision can be combined to produce smooth buttocks and thighs in a relatively short time.

But don’t take my word for any of this. Conduct your own research –- online and at your local library. Cellulite is a condition that requires personal treatment and personal choices. Some members of the healthcare profession disagree that Mesotherapy is an effective treatment; others say it’s the only effective treatment.

My advice: look for proven results! Demand solid science behind any claims made by so-called experts. Then make up your own mind. Above all, recognize that cellulite is a condition that will develop independent of most of your personal choices. After all, who would willingly develop cellulite if she or he had any choice in the matter?

Pioneering the use of Mesotherapy in the U.S. to combat cellulite, Dr. Lionel Bissoon has helped thousands of women experience cellulite-free legs and buttocks. Complete with case studies, before-and-after photos and straightforward advice, his new book, "The Cellulite Cure" offers hope to cottage cheese thighs everywhere. To discover the only proven treatment option for cellulite, go to

April 5, 2010


Holiday Weight Loss: The Garter Belt Hypothesis
by PattyJames

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By using the words "garter belt" in my title, I wanted to grab your attention. However, over the years, I developed a theory that if I wore a garter belt, silk nylons and heels I would feel sexier and eat less.

Eventually it just took up too much time, but on occasion it still works for me. In my opinion, pantyhose are terrifically uncomfortable anyway, so why not give it a try?

It doesn't have to be the garter-belt scenario, but find something that makes you feel like you do not want to overeat.

I believe it was Sophia Loren who said she never wears anything with an elastic waist, as it's too easy to eat too much and gradually gain weight until you put on your clothes that have waistbands and find that you can't zip them. I have found this to be a good tip.

Standing up really straight also helps me to eat less, silly as that may sound.

The holiday season is renowned for being the packing-on-the-pounds season; so between the garter belt and the following tips maybe this year you can maintain or even lose weight during the season:

Chocolates in boxes are everywhere...
Don't have them on your desk or in your house. Don't put them in your freezer as that will not slow you down; they can be eaten frozen and we all know it. Give them away or if you have great self-control, limit yourself to one a day at most for up to five days per season.

When you have your one chocolate, you need to eat it after you eat a salad and do savor it. Remember, food should not be a reward. Being healthy is its own reward. Also, deprivation rarely works long term, so a few chocolates are OK!

The Buf-fat Table
Walk around the buffet table at least once to size up the selections. Are there fresh veggies and fruit? Watch out for all the cheese platters, breads, crackers and high-calorie choices. Your plate should be at least half vegetables with a small dollop of dip -- dips are usually high fat (and it's the wrong kind of fat) and high in sodium. Don't forget to select a protein source whether that is a piece of chicken or fish or a bean dish.

Calories and Sugar in a Glass
That would be alcohol. Four ounces of champagne or wine is about 100 calories. Many people have wine goblets, not glasses and it's very easy to drink much more than four ounces. And this unthinking drinking easily contributes to holiday weight gain.

Drink plenty of water, sip wine only with meals and limit your consumption. Remember in the nutrition world "support your liver" is the mantra; your liver really doesn't like alcohol.

The Bottom Line: Eat more vegetables, limit your alcohol and desserts, up your water intake and, of course, continue regular exercise.

In good health,

Patty James. M.S. is a Vital Health Educator and Nutrition Coach who founded the first certified organic cooking school and nutrition center in America.

December 21, 2009


Vitamin-Enhanced Waters: Help or Hype?
by BrandDoctorKerry

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There used to be three things you could count on: death, taxes and, and chemical-free water in a bottle. Now there are two. Yes, the Grim Reaper still looms, and no politician we know is calling for an end to their beloved taxes. But do take note – someone is screwing with our screw-topped waters!

By now you’ve probably noticed the new kids on the bottled water block of your local grocery store. Next to your spring and glacier waters there’s an oasis of “vitamin-enhanced” waters.

Vitamin-enhanced water… hmmm, on the surface it sure sounds like a super idea, right? Well, no. These products are all wet. They take this week’s prize for the most blatent Healthy Food Imposters.

Case in point:

Dasani Plus, Vitamin-Enhanced Flavored Water Beverage

Take a look at the front label. It seems to imply the product is extremely healthy. You can’t help but imagine this water is enhanced with super vitamins that will defend and protect your health!

But read the fine print and it becomes clear that the only thing this water will defend and protect against is being healthy. See for yourself.

(8 fl. oz., 0 calories, 0g fat, 25mg sodium, 0g carbs, 0g protein, 10% Vit E, 10% zinc)

Ingredients (chemical additives are in bold) Filtered water; Natural Flavors; Citric Acid; Potassium Sorbate, Potassium Benzoate and EDTA (to protect taste); Phosphoric Acid, Acesulfame Potassium, Ginseng Extract, Zinc Gluconate; Sucralose; Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E); Yellow 5; Red 40

Decoding the Fine Print

We dislike being manipulated by sneaky marketing types. But it’s obvious to our food sleuths that this manufacturer designed the front label with the average unsuspecting shopper in mind. It’s chock-full of trickery.

For starters, each serving only provides 10% of the RDA for Vitamin E and Zinc. We hate to douse good intentions but that’s just not a very substantial amount. Sadly, what is substantial are the chemical additives pumped into this once-healthy beverage. We found:

• Three chemical preservatives – potassium sorbate, potassium benzoate, and EDTA.
• Two artificial chemical sweeteners – acesulfame potassium and sucralose.
• Phosphoric acid, a chemical additive found in most soft drinks.
• Two artificial color additives – yellow #5 and red #40.
Just to be clear, they took an unadulterated bottle of water and mixed in a bunch of chemical additives, insignificant amounts of vitamins, artificial coloring and a splash of fizz for good measure. Oh, then they upped the price and slapped a colorful yet misleading label on the bottle.

It’s a brilliant idea… in a marketing and sales kind of way. But for the uninformed consumer, it’s just plain wrong.

Reality Check

The bottled water aisle is one place where it a pays to be a super-savvy shopper who’s soaked up a little BrandAid know-how.

Don’t be fooled by the health hype on ANY brand of vitamin-enhanced water. Bypass the front labels, and go directly to ingredients list. Regardless of the brand, you’ll find all the clues you need to drink in the facts not the fluff.

Remember, when you’re armed with a little BrandAid know-how,
you’re in control at the grocery store.

And when you're linked up with a proven diet based on your unique personality, you will lose weight. Click here to start losing weight today.

Kerry McLeod is's chief Brand Doctor and a regular blogger here at Kerry's mission in life is to teach food shoppers how to cut through the clutter at the grocery store in order to find the truly healthy brand-name foods. If smart food shopping appeals to you, go to and sign up for free newsletters.

September 7, 2009


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